Broadoak Hill reopens early


Broadoak Hill in Dundry has reopened today (Thursday) after works to repair the road were completed ahead of schedule.

The extensive works, which had been expected to take eight weeks to complete, began in early October and involved excavating the road so that a new retaining wall could be installed, as well as building a new footway and resurfacing the road.

The new retaining wall is made up of a series of gabion baskets which are large cages filled with rocks. These are placed deep into the ground next to the road, then built up to the required height providing a retaining wall that supports the road and protects against movement. The wall has a minimum design life of 120 years.

Once the retaining wall was completed crews installed a new pavement with adjacent fence before the road was resurfaced. Finally, road markings were relined prior to the route reopening to traffic this afternoon.

Cllr Elfan Ap Rees, North Somerset Council’s deputy leader and executive member with responsibility for highways, said: “I’d like to thank our engineers and contractors for their hard work in completing these works ahead of schedule, as well as local residents and motorists for their co-operation and patience while the works took place.

“This was a large job for our design engineers and the crews on site. Firstly they had to carry out exploratory and preparatory works to resolve the structural failure of the road. I apologise to local residents for the delay in carrying out this work, but during the investigations we found clear evidence of a leak in the clay material beneath the road which showed that it was the burst water main which was the cause. This meant that the road could no longer support the weight of a vehicle and began to collapse.

“With that in mind, engineers were able to design an appropriate repair so that our contractors could then get on and complete this much-needed repair work, making sure that the road will be structurally sound for years to come.”

The work was carried out by Drayton Construction Ltd on behalf of the council at a cost of £167,000 with Bristol Water’s insurance company meeting the majority of the costs.​